G. J. Ramstedt in the radio studio with Sakari Pälsi, 1948 On the left G. J. Ramstedt (Gustaf John Ramstedt 1873-1950), explorer and Altai language linguist in the radio studio with colleague, archaeologist and explorer - also journalist, writer and photographer - Sakari Pälsi (1882-1965). Yle Archives, the Finnish Broadcasting Company: yle.fi/yleisradio/about-yle/this-is-yle

AMIA at 30

Did you know that AMIA is turning 30 this year?

#AMIAat30

The Publications Committee, office, and board of directors thought it would be fun during this stressful time to journey back through older newspaper articles that make mention of the association and our members’ activities.

Here’s a little taste of where we’ve been, and maybe dream about where we might go collectively. If you have any old articles you think might fit the theme, pass them along to board member Melissa Dollman via the office.

Enjoy!

1977 – Before AMIA

This week for #AMIAat30 , we head back to pre-AMIA days once again to 1977. On August 21, 1977, the Miami Herald published a piece called “Old Movies Don’t Die — They Rot Away.” In it John Kuiper (Library of Congress) speaks about an awakening cultural awareness in the U.S. to the importance of film preservation and the new Archives Advisory Committee — that would later be renamed Film Archives Advisory Committee (FAAC), a precursor to AMIA.
Kuiper early on recognized the need in the United States for a unique organization which embraced the diversity of collections and institutions while also focusing on the individual archivists themselves. John Kuiper passed away in 2017 and attendees of the conference in New Orleans, you may remember that we honored John Kuiper (along with Stephan Parr and Jim Wheeler) with a giant Second Line parade down and around the streets surrounding the conference hotel.
And if you look at page two you’ll also catch a look at Mark Hamill as Star Wars shoots him to fame.